02 - January - 2018

Lucky 7: third sector organisations doing great things online

Post by Drew J
Ixis Service

Should third sector organisations invest in their online presence?

According to these seven, the answer is a resounding yes. A rich and considered online presence can help charities and other organisations in the third sector to communicate their work with clarity and creativity, to share their success, to inspire new supporters to join in – and, ultimately, to do more of their vital work.

We love celebrating digital innovation and excellence at Ixis – so, in this blog, we’re guiding you through seven of our favourite examples from the third sector.

World Food Programme (WFP)

The World Food Programme website has one of the clearest navigations and routes to donation we’ve seen. WFP also runs an accompanying app called ShareTheMeal, through which a tap on a smartphone donates $0.50 – enough for one meal for one child. The smoother and simpler charities can make it for visitors to donate online, the more money they can raise for their vital work – a vital lesson for any third sector organisation examining its online presence.

Oxfam

One of the biggest charities in the world, the Oxfam website manages to deliver absolute clarity in terms of what the organisation does, the impact it has, and exactly what visitors to the website can do to help. The homepage alone offers routes to volunteering, direct donations, the online shop, current campaigns and charitable events – and yet the navigation to all of these remains clear and precise.

Oxfam Webpage

Comic Relief

A clean and clear website, built in Drupal 8, with short page lengths which lead seamlessly from a headline description of the charity through to more detailed history and impact. The website is equally responsive regardless of which device a visitor is using, which is vital for websites that users might browse on their mobile devices, and the design is clear and lightweight, making it fast to load and easy to navigate, making donations as easy as possible during their high volume periods. The Comic Relief website is very striking in its use of fonts and colour – there’s no fuss and no unnecessary detail.

The British Council

The UK’s international organisation for cultural relations and educational opportunities is a masterclass in harnessing the power and impact of more corporate sites. This global organisation needs to incorporate a vast number of individual sites and portals within its main website, yet it does so with a clear layout and smooth navigation. For charities that cover a lot of disparate services or end users, this is a great website to learn from.

British Council Webpage

Red Nose Day

The Red Nose Day website is one of the most effective we’ve seen in terms of communicating impact – the bold headline figure on the homepage is a direct thank you to the organisation’s supporters. This is a ‘less is more’ site – there is far less content here than on some of the others – but it shows how bold design and clear navigation can have a powerful effect.

Macmillan Cancer Support

By contrast, the Macmillan website is a great example of how to include a huge volume of information in a clearly navigable and accessible way. The handwritten fonts and intimate imagery make for a website with a highly personal feel – perfectly in keeping with the space the charity operates in.

Macmillan Webpage

National Trust

We love the National Trust website’s use of photography. The scrolling ‘hero image’ on the homepage is striking and compelling – and, crucially, it looks just as beautiful on mobile devices. Mobile responsiveness is not always top of the list when developing a new website, but with increasing numbers of users accessing sites on their smartphones and tablets, it is a vital consideration.

Are you a third sector organisation looking to emulate these successes?

Get in touch with Ixis today to find out more about how we can help with your web development, hosting and support – the powerhouses behind a compelling website.

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